Acne is a common yet complex skin disorder that affects four out of five Americans. Many people believe that acne is a skin problem experienced mainly by teenagers, however, it is estimated that 25% of adult men and 50% of adult women will also experience acne at some point in their lives.

Science has answered many questions regarding the cause and formation of acne, but still more research is underway.   The aim of this research is to gain a better understanding on how to prevent acne from forming in the first instance.

Acne can be described as a disorder of the skin barrier system. We see this in the redness, inflammation, oiliness, dryness, blackheads, whiteheads, and pimples. While genetic programming and lifestyle choices certainly play a role in the development acne, recent research has uncovered a link between the initial formations of an acne lesion, called a comedone, with an essential fatty acid deficiency of linoleic acid within the opening of the hair follicle.

Corneotherapy is a sensible approach to acne treatment because it addresses the disorder from multiple angles. The dermaviduals skin care range allows for the topical application of linoleic acid which helps reduce the formation of early acne lesions. dermaviduals customized serums and base creams are designed to target each involved barrier system and improve the symptoms of acne.

Our products are not only safe and effective, but also reduce the progression of pimples, cysts, scarring and inflammatory pigmentation.  Your skin therapist can customize your treatment determined by evaluation of your skin type, your symptoms and your lifestyle. Receive targeted corneotherapy treatments for your acne with the dermaviduals skin care range.

Acne Resource Links

Acne Prevention and Care

Acne  – The Potential of Cosmetic Prevention

Acne Caused by Too Many Different Moisturizing Factors in Creams

Barrier Function in Different Regions of the Hair Follicle Predicts Susceptibility to Acne and the Route for Transcutaneous Drug Delivery

Lipoxygenases Mediate the Effect of Essential Fatty Acid in Skin Barrier Formation

Fatty Acids of Acylceramides From Comedones and From The Skin Surface of Acne Patients and Control Subjects